On farm

Fact sheets and links to agricultural advice, animal health and welfare information, biosecurity updates and more.

Some of the following guides were developed during the flood emergency and may contain references to the AASFA 1800 phone number. This number is not currently operational - instead, please contact your nearest Local Land Services office on 1300 795 299.

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Agriculture
Animal Health and Welfare 
Natural Resource Management 
Pests and Weeds 

Agriculture

**NEW**Emergency Plans in Isolated Communities - Hunter

The extremes of recent years have shown emergency planning to be a necessity for everyone, yet it can be easy to put off making and testing our plans, especially while we’re in recovery.

Emergency Plans in Isolated Communities

Managing a Small Beef Herd in Wet Conditions - North Coast

Developed by the North Coast team to address current conditions, this guide provides critical decision making information to livestock producers preparing for a wet winter. The principals outlined in this guide can be applied to larger herds and in other regions where similar conditions exist:

Managing a Small Beef Herd in Wet Conditions

Free Soil and Water Testing - Planning for Recovery

In response to the recent floods and rainfall, North Coast Local Land Services is offering up to 2 free water tests and 2 free soil tests per farmer:

Click here for more information

Assistance with Animal Welfare Issues

This handy checklist steps you through the potential Animal Health and Welfare issues you might encounter after a flood and provides guidance on who to contact for help:

After flood on-farm checklist

Pasture Recovery After a Coastal Flood (North Coast)

Different pasture species vary in their ability to survive a flood - this guide walks you through the common pasture species of the North Coast, what to expect when flooding occurs, and what your management options are:

Pasture recovery after a coastal flood

Pasture Recovery After a Flood -  North Western

Different pasture species vary in their ability to survive a flood - this guide walks you through the common pasture species of the North West NSW region, what to expect when flooding occurs, and what your management options are:

Pasture Recovery After a Flood -  North Western

Managing Waterlogging in Crops - Northern NSW

Waterlogging occurs when roots cannot respire due to excessive water in the soil. This guide explains the damage that can occur as well as how to assess and minimise the damage:

Managing waterlogging in crops - Northern NSW

Denitrification in Cropping (Cereals)

The complex process of denitrification due to waterlogging can lead to nutritional deficiencies in cereal grains - this fact sheet explains this process:

Denitrification in Cropping

Cropping in the Wet (North West)

Information on summer cropping after a flood in the North West of NSW, and the impact floods can have on production.

Cropping in the Wet

Natural Disaster Assistance Guide for Primary Producers

This is a general guide to the assistance available to primary producers after a natural disaster:

Natural disaster assistance guide for primary producers

EPA Managing Dairy Waste and Stock After a Flood

Information from the Victoria EPA on how pollutants from dairy farm effluents (liquid waste and sewage) can wash into waterways after rainfall:

Read more here


Animal Health and Welfare

**NEW**Grazing and Livestock Management Over Winter - Hunter

Managing your herd or flock can be challenging at the best of times - with the current conditions taken into account, this guide gives Hunter livestock managers direction on where to start and what to consider:

Grazing and Livestock Management Over Winter

**NEW**Disease Risk from Flood Waters and Flooded Pasture - Hunter

An extract from the May 2015 Hunter Animal Health Newsletter explaining why it is important to inspect livestock on a daily basis after a flood:

Disease Risk from Flood Waters and Flooded Pasture (Extract)

**NEW**Winter 2022 Cattle Health Update for the Hunter Region

An updated version of the wet weather advisory newsletter issued in April.

Winter 2022 Cattle Health Update

Animal Disposal Advice

This fact sheet provides advice on disposal of deceased animals after a flood.

The 1800# referred to in this document is not currently operational. For more advice please contact your nearest Local Land Services office on 1300 795 299:

Animal Disposal Advice

Caring for Livestock in Times of Flood

Prolonged wet conditions can lead to significant feed shortages, higher stocking densities and intermingling of groups of animals that would not normally be kept together. Animals are often physiologically stressed, leading to reduced immune system function and have softened feet and skin as a result of prolonged wetting. This combined with better survival conditions for bacteria, biting insects and worm eggs and larvae results in a far higher risk of disease in flood affected stock. It is important that owners monitor their livestock closely and contact their veterinarian if they detect any signs of disease or illness:

Caring for livestock in times of flood

Horse Care After Floods

If your horses have been affected by flooding, it is important to assess them as soon as it is safe to do so. You should identify any injuries or illnesses and contact your veterinarian if required. Ensure your horses have access to food, clean drinking water and shelter. It is important that owners monitor their horses closely and contact their veterinarian if they detect any signs of illness or injuries:

Horse care after floods

Managing Feed and Fodder Risks

This fact sheet was written for drought but is also relevant for flood. When bringing fodder and feed onto your property, you are exposed to pests, diseases and weeds found in other parts of Australia that you do not currently have:

Managing feed and fodder risks

Safely transporting flood affected livestock

Extra care is required when transporting cattle, sheep and goats that have been through flood waters and restricted food intake to prevent stock going down in trucks due to low energy and mineral levels.

Managing Erosion Before and After Floods

Flooding can cause significant riverbank erosion, particularly if there is limited vegetation in place to bind the soil together. There are
a range of measures land managers can undertake to repair erosion damage, that will also ensure riverbanks, floodplains and gullies are better protected against future flooding events:

Managing erosion before and after floods

Flood Affected Wildlife

Many native animals are displaced following extreme stormy weather events and floods. Flood water can inundate and destroy habitat, physically displacing animals and increasing competition for dry ground. This fact sheet provides information on what to do if you encounter flood affected wildlife:

Flood Affected Wildlife


Pests and Weeds

Fire Ants

Fire ants are highly mobile and can fly long distances, raft on waterways after floods or wet weather events and be moved in organic material into new areas. For more information on fire ants, visit the DPI website:

Yellow Crazy Ants

Red Imported Fire Ants

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