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Showcasing cultural heritage during NAIDOC Week

Local Land Services is highlighting the diversity of programs and projects being undertaken throughout the state to support Aboriginal people to care for Country and share traditional land management knowledge during NAIDOC Week 2016.

NAIDOC Week 2016 runs from 3 to 10 July and is an opportunity for all Australians to come together to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The 2016 theme, Songlines — The living narrative of our nation, highlights the importance of Songlines to the existence of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Local Land Services Executive Chair, Tim de Mestre said Local Land Services recognised the importance and value of traditional knowledge in the management of natural resources and productive agricultural land.

“Our 10-year strategic plan has strategies in place to deliver services that support Aboriginal people to care for Country and share traditional land management knowledge,” he said.

“Improving connection to Country for Aboriginal people has significant potential to increase the transfer of traditional ecological knowledge, engage young Aboriginal people in learning about their culture and improve land management outcomes.”

“Training and employment opportunities in natural resource management and agriculture are important economically to Aboriginal communities but also a means to engage Aboriginal people in caring for their Country and practicing traditional land management techniques.

Mr de Mestre said NAIDOC Week offered an opportunity to pay respects to Country; honour those who work tirelessly on preserving land, sea and culture and to share the stories of many sites of significance or sacred places with the nation.

“We value the contributions of the NSW and Australian Governments who fund many on-ground projects, resulting in a healthier and more productive environment and opportunities to build stronger relationships with the Aboriginal community,” he said.

“Many traditional land management techniques, for example the use of fire to manage landscapes, can have a positive effect on species diversity, landscape health and agricultural productivity.”

Local Land Services has produced a special NAIDOC Week edition of its newsletter Local Links.

This publication showcases the diversity of partnerships and projects being undertaken to support Aboriginal people to care for Country and share traditional land management knowledge.

Download Local Links NAIDOC Week 2016.